Indigenous defiance: Decolonization, education, and systemic change in Canada

Title
Indigenous defiance: Decolonization, education, and systemic change in Canada
Speaker(s)
Speaker: Dr Dustin Louis # University of Calgary
Hosted by
Introduced by
Date and Time
13th Nov 2019 14:00 - 13th Nov 2019 16:00
Location
Room G.3, Bayes Centre, 47 Potterrow
URL
http://www.sps.ed.ac.uk/cst/events_at_the_centre/open_research_seminars/2019_2020/indigenous_defiance_decolonization,_education,_and_systemic_change_in_canada

In this lecture Canadian First Nation (Dakelh) scholar Dr. Dustin Louie will address the impacts of colonization on the contemporary experiences of Indigenous peoples. Building from a brief examination of colonization in Canada, the lecture will focus on decolonizing and indigenizing approaches to education and social justice.  Adhering to strengths-based models, the lecture will highlight the epistemologies and complex traditions of Indigenous communities as the way forward. Through the unpacking of projects Dr. Louie has led, the presentation will address topics of sexual exploitation of Indigenous girls, homelessness, post-secondary education,  parental engagement in education, embedding Indigenous knowledges into our organizations, and beyond. The aim of this lecture is to share knowledge regarding the impacts of and responses to colonization of Indigenous communities of Canada, but also challenging European scholars and practitioners to take up the mantle of reconciliation. Moreover, the goal of Dr. Louie’s work extends beyond the theoretical, pursuing practical applications of Indigenous knowledges and decolonizing strategies in wide ranging contexts. 

Dr. Dustin Louie is a First Nations scholar from Nee Tahi Buhn and Nadleh Whut’en of central British Columbia. He is a member of the Beaver Clan. Dustin’s education background includes a degree in Canadian history, a Master's in International Relations, and a PhD in Educational Research. The topic of Dr. Louie’s dissertation was Sexual Exploitation Prevention Education for Indigenous Girls. He has worked as an historian in a land claims law firm, studied Indigenous homelessness in Western Canada, worked internationally for non-governmental organizations in Uganda and Australia, and is now at the Werklund School of Education in the University of Calgary. As a tenure-track Assistant Professor, he teaches primarily in courses related to Indigenous education, social justice, and educational philosophy. Further research interests include practical approaches to Indigenizing education, decolonizing education, Indigenous pedagogies, and critical theory. Dr. Louie is conducting research, educational design, and training with First Nations, schools, and organizations across Western Canada. In addition, he has led work with private companies, government agencies, school districts, and non-governmental organizations in reconciliation, decolonizing and indigenizing projects. Dr. Louie’s research has been published in The Canadian Journal of Education, The Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education, and the Critical Education, among other places.