An Alternative Investigation of Social Class Inequalities in School Attainment: Occupations, Capitals and Resources

Title
An Alternative Investigation of Social Class Inequalities in School Attainment: Occupations, Capitals and Resources
Speaker(s)
Speaker: Vernon Gayle # University of Edinburgh; Introduced by: Lindsay Paterson # University of Edinburgh
Hosted by
Introduced by
Date and Time
14th Oct 2019 13:00 - 14th Oct 2019 14:15
Location
Violet Laidlaw Room (6.02), 6th floor, Chrystal Macmillan Building
URL
http://www.sps.ed.ac.uk/q-step/community/events/research_seminars/2019/an_alternative_investigation_of_social_class_inequalities_in_school_attainment_occupations,_capitals_and_resources

Despite developments in education systems, and a raft of policies directed towards combating inequality, there is a clear and persistent negative relationship between parent’s social class and filial educational outcomes in the UK. There are a plethora of measures of social class, and social stratification more widely. Occupation based measures are most frequently used, although more recently the propriety of such approaches have been questioned. An emerging school of thought advocates the use of more culturally based measures as the most appropriate indicators of an individual’s social class position, an argument predominantly influenced by the work of Bourdieu. 

In this seminar, Vernon Gayle presents a comprehensive investigation of the possibilities of operationalising a meaningful capitals and resources based measure of social class using existing large-scale social survey data that he conducted together with colleagues Chris Playford (University of Exeter) and Roxanne Connelly (University of York). Using data from Understanding Society linked with administrative data on school General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) examination results, the research team compares and contrasts the insights provided by occupation-based social stratification measures with those provided by a capitals and resources based social class measure developed using Latent Class Analysis. 

This seminar will take place on 14th October from 1pm in the Violet Laidlaw Room (6.02) on the sixth floor of the Chrystal Macmillan Building.

Three students looking at laptops