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Disability Research Edinburgh - December Seminar

Title
Disability Research Edinburgh - December Seminar
Speaker(s)
Hosted by
Introduced by
Date and Time
2nd Dec 2016 15:00 - 2nd Dec 2016 17:00
Location
Room LG.06, David Hume Tower, George Square, Edinburgh
URL
http://www.sps.ed.ac.uk/research/research_centres/cross_school_research_clusters/disability_research_edinburgh/events_and_activities/2016_2017/disability_research_edinburgh_-_december_seminar

The next Disability Research Edinburgh seminar will be take place on the 2nd of December, at 3-5pm, in, Room LG.06, David Hume Tower, George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9JX

Our speakers at this event are Dr. Katherine Brookfield and Phoebe Fielding, members of the DRE network and currently based in the University of Edinburgh.

Dr. Katherine Brookfield and Phoebe Fielding will speak on:

Physical environments and community reintegration post stroke: qualitative insights from stroke clubs 

and

App-cessibility? An Inquiry into how the Euan’s Guide App is Changing Urban Space and Accessibility for People with Disabilities

This promises to be another excellent event in the DRE calendar and in addition to the chance to get an insight into the fascinating work of these two researchers, this will be a good opportunity to do some networking and meet with members of the DRE network.

 This seminar is open to the public and no registration is needed. Please don't hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.
 
Please feel free to spread the word and invite anyone you think would like to come along!
 
 
 
Disability Research Edinburgh seminar series - Abstracts for December seminar:
 
Dr. Katherine Brookfield
 
Title: Physical environments and community reintegration post stroke: qualitative insights from stroke clubs 
 
Abstract: This presentation will report findings from a study which investigated the environment’s role in community reintegration amongst persons with experience of stroke. Focus group discussions with 29 individuals recruited from community stroke clubs in Scotland revealed that stroke influenced a person’s perceptions, experience, use and enjoyment of the environment. Multiple specific (e.g. theatres, cafes) and more general (out-of-the-home) environments appeared capable of supporting community reintegration, providing settings in which individuals were able and willing to interact with others and participate in various functional, social and recreational activities. The implications for policy and practice are considered.
 
Free access to the journal article written by Professor Gillian Mead and Katherine can be found via the following link:
 
 
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Phoebe Fielding
 
Title: "App-cessibility? An Inquiry into how the Euan’s Guide App is Changing Urban Space and Accessibility for People with Disabilities"
 
Abstract: The UK government’s Department for Work and Pensions has shown that high street businesses could be turning away the custom of 1 in 5 people, and their combined income of £212 billion, due to inadequate disability provision. Although presented in economic terms, this figure illustrates the extent of spatial inaccessibility for disabled people in the UK. This project assesses the contributions made by Euan’s Guide to this issue of inaccessibility. In so doing, it uses the app as a lens through which to analyse the possibilities and challenges of the increasing interaction between disabled people and technology.
 This research found that the app provides some disabled people with the information, support and confidence to travel to new places and meet people. It is argued that greater interaction between disabled people and public venues is raising awareness for the inaccessibility issue on a variety of scales – leading to a change in provision. What’s more, this paper discusses how technology has the capacity to alter its users’ sense of space. As such, this work opens up space for thinking about how insights from phenomenology1 can be worked into future research on the relationship between the disability community and technology.
 
[1]. Current research on the relationship between the disability community and technology is focused on the material/structural influence of technology on this sector of society. As a phenomenologically informed study of this relationship, however, this research will focus on the embodied experience of action and meaning making during app use in physical and social settings.
 

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