School of Social and Political Science

Lee Chalmers

Job Title

PhD student

Background

PhD title

"Online vitriol and women’s engagement in feminist activism and debate in the UK
."

My PhD research looks into how feminist women experience and engage with online conflict and debate and how this shapes their engagement in feminist activism both on and offline.

Supervisors

Qualifications

  • London School of Economics, MSc Gender, Policy and Inequalities, 2014
  • Regents University London, Certificate Counselling and Psychotherapy, 2003
  • University of Leeds, MA Philosophy,  1999
  • University of Stirling, BA Philosophy, 1995

Teaching

Lecturing
  • University of Edinburgh, Business School, Influencing skills for MBA students, 2016, 2017
  • University of Chicago, Booth School of Business, The Core Skills of Coaching, 2012
  • University of Leeds, Aristotles Ethics (maternity cover), 1998
  • University of Leeds, Logic (maternity cover), 1998
  • University of Leeds, Philosophy Summer School, 1997-1999
Tutoring
  • London Busness School, University of London, EMBA tutoring, 2013 to present
  • University of Leeds, Undergradute Philosophy Tutor, 1997-1999
  • University of Leeds, Summer School in Philosophy, 1997-1999

Conferences

  • New Directions, University of Edinburgh, March 2016
  • 'Women, Media and Politics' organised by University of Stirling, on panel entitled 'Being a feminist in public'. June 2016
  • New Directions, University of Edinburgh, April 2017. 'Digital Sociologies' panel.

Research interests

Research interests

Previous research

MSc thesis

The thesis sought to understand how the problem of online abuse has been conceptualised and represented by legislators in the UK and what implications that representation has for gender equality. Utilising Carol Bacchis ‘What’s the problem represented to be? framework it analysed the applicable legislation (Malicious Communications Act 1998 and Communications Act 2003) and the Crown Prosecution Service guidelines on prosecuting messages sent via social media.

It paid particular attention to how the problem representation has changed over the last decade and in doing so argued that priority has been given to a discourse of freedom of expression that intersects with a conceptual silence around gender to discount women's experience of online abuse and foreclose credible resistance to the problem.

Publications

  • How I Became a Coach, Self and Society: Journal of the Association of Humanistic Psychology in Britain, Aug 2004

Research reported in media

Works within